[Zetta’s Reference Desk] – Getting Started as a Freelance Writer by Robert Bly

Getting Started as a Freelance Writer is an essential book in my writer’s library. I’ve owned this guide since 2009, and while sometimes months pass between using it, I always find something useful in its folded, dog-eared, marked up pages. Continue reading [Zetta’s Reference Desk] – Getting Started as a Freelance Writer by Robert Bly

Grammar & Punctuation – The “Rules” are Meant to be Broken

When it comes to writing fiction, a lot of the rules we learned (or should have learned) in school can be bent, stretched, and even broken. A competent author will do this to create a certain effect or mood. Unless you know these rules, you won’t know the ones you can use and the ones you can do without. Continue reading Grammar & Punctuation – The “Rules” are Meant to be Broken

[BOOK REVIEW] The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore

What first attracts attention to this book is the title. Seeing The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat on a list of other titles, one may wonder if it is about a little-known performance done before The Supremes became mega stars, or maybe it’s a fictional story involving the actual singers similar to the Eleanor Roosevelt mystery series penned by her son Elliott. It would be wrong to assume such things. The real Supremes do not appear in the novel (although Mrs. Roosevelt does). Author Edward Kelsey Moore has created an attention grabbing title that compels further investigation. Continue reading [BOOK REVIEW] The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat by Edward Kelsey Moore

Who Farted? : Why Character Development is Important to Your Plot

Here’s the scenario. A man and women are alone in an elevator when the foul, sulfuric, tell-tale sign that someone has committed an olfactory offence occurs. It’s a real nose stinger so rank it melts your nasal hair. The man and woman look at each other. Who farted? It’s the ultimate whodunnit. Continue reading Who Farted? : Why Character Development is Important to Your Plot

Act Your Age! : Why the age of your character is important.

When we create a character for our story, we usually start with a typical laundry list of traits: eye color, hair color, height, weight, gender, ethnicity, occupation. We may even go so far as to detail their habits, likes, and dislikes. But when we assign the character an age, we need to think about more than just a number. Continue reading Act Your Age! : Why the age of your character is important.